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. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
, it is a scandal. but if it came up in the of the context that you raised first, it's just part of life in america. >> ladies and gentlemen, on that note, floyd has kindly agreed to sign his book. again, critics have given it an incredible review, and it's just a breathtaking book. i've read and it's breathtaking. i would strongly urge you to have your book signed by floyd but if you could just remain seated for about 20 seconds. my last question to float, could you tell us if the society for challenge into getting and the supreme court questioning? [laughter] >> certainly much more relaxing. >> actually. on outlook know, ladies and gentlemen, please join me in thanking one of the most brilliant scholars and lawyers that this nation has had that has impacted many of our lives on a regular basis. thank you. [applause] >> you are watching tv on c-span2. 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> up next, booktv's peter slen into his office and one. this weaknesses concludes with military historian antony beevor followed by victorian era expert judith flanders. antony beevor talked ab
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
sisters. they're twins with each other. twin kids would be great. >>> making news in america this morning. >> stay with us for "good morning america." and have a wonderful thursday, everyone. >>> the man accused of killing a cop right in front of their young daughter is in custody this morning. now those who knew the victims are trying to come to terms with the horrific crime. >>> the raiives are getting ready to -- the ravens are getting ready to hit the field for the third preseason game. a look at what the weather will be like when you head down to m and t bank stadium. >> thanks for joining us, friday is almost here, i'm megan pringle. >> i'm charley crowson. a live look down at little italy. a beautiful start to this thursday, august 22nd. lynette, what's going on weather wise today? >> all right, charley, yes, we do have the potential for more showers and storms, isolated, scattered in nature as we go throughout the day. like you said, right now we are nice and dry. we do have a few clouds out there. but all in all we will need the umbrella as we go into the afternoon, just some of
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
higher for the remainder of the year. and, again, in 2014, we'll talk to the ceo of america's natural gas alliance. and next, as we head to break, a look at july's best and worst-performing dow components. if you're serious about taking your trading to a higher level, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then schwab is the place to trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-888-284-9410 or visit schwab.com/trading to tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 learn how you can earn up to 300 commission-free online trades tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for six months with qualifying net deposits. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see how easy and intuitive it is to use tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 our most powerful platform, streetsmart edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 we put it in the cloud so you can use it on the web. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade with our most advanced tools tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 on whatever computer you're on. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 also, get a dedicated team of schwab trading specialists tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 who will help you customize your platform tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 even from the comfort of your home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and talk about ideas and
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
a lot of inconsistencinconsistenc. in the americas, things are going pretty well as they are in northern europe. in southern europe, not as well. in japan, where cisco was doing very well last year, now they have some tough comparisons. also in the rest of asia, it is just a mixed bag. china is an area where cisco continues to have trouble. ceo john chambers said on the conference call cisco is committed to delivering on the financial targets they set, like gross margins being above 60%, like earnings growing faster than revenue in most quarters, well managed businesses do that, he said. and therefore that necessitates the making of the cuts so they are able to roll with the punches and the changes in this environment. he also said that cisco is taking too long to make decisions. he's going to cut out some layers that are slowing cisco down. but the stock tumbled at one point more than 10% after hours. if that is indeed where the stock opens later today, it will be back to the levels where it was back in may. guys, back to you. >> here is a quick look at cisco shares in germany, off by s
>>> making news in america this morning, political unrest. it's shaping up to be another contentious day in egypt, as the country's former leader could be released from jail at any moment. we're in washington with the latest. >>> back to class where a gunman opened fire. as the wild 911 call to police. >> i'm in the front office. ooh, he just went outside and started shooting. >> this morning, a new look at what was happening amid that chaos. >>> water and trees swallowed into a slurry. dramatic video showing the furious force of nature. >>> and these sunbathers get quite the surprise when something strange comes ashore. >>> good morning thursday morning. we begin with the threat of more political turmoil in egypt. >> the country's hard line former leader, hosni mubarak, is expected to sun walk free from his prison. his release could re-ignite anger, which is just beginning to frad. abc's preeti arla is joining us this morning from washington. good morning, preeti. >> reporter: he is expected to be placed under house arrest. the situation could add fuel to the fire in a c
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
on "america this morning" and "good morning america." you will be able to find updates anytime on abc.com. >>> we have some serious breaking news from southern california, where residents have been trapped as a dangerous fire rages out of control. the fire burning in riverside county, near banning, had to block the escape route. one resident and two firefighters have been hurt in this blaze. the fast-moving fire began midafternoon and spread quickly to eight square miles. abc news is on the scene. we have a full report in our next half-hour. >>> also, three people suffering minor burns after a gas leak sparked a fire on campus of college in suburban philadelphia. a construction worker ruptured a four-inch underground gas line while crews were installing a light post for an athletic complex at rosemont college. >>> millions of people in the middle of the country are bracing for a day of wet and wild weather. a deadly rainmaker hovering over kansas and parts of missouri. the rapidly rising floodwaters are overtaking communities, stranding families, and keeping rescuers on the move. abc'
on political trips with him in the united states into south and latin america which was very unusual for women in her generation. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a young girl. she was very proud of the fact that she spoke fluent french and german which he perfected while she was at the content making the best of a bad situation which would become her mantra in life. when she married this was a way to escape both the boisterous mess of the children and perhaps some of the upset over the weaknesses in her marriage and in some ways perhaps was also a form of birth control because of worst the catholic church the catholic church would not have allowed any artificial contraception. >> host: she thought mine was enough. >> guest: she thought mine was enough and in later years she was on the merv griffin show in the early 70's and he brought up that her son bobby and his wife ethel had 11. rose said well if i had known it was a competition i might've had more than nine. >> host: i think it was a bit of a competition. there was one trip where they want to rush on that was unusual for w
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
america, you had no idea. it angers me because there's a responsibility there to the people investing in these companies, listed on that exchange, and, you know, to make sure they're aware of exactly what was going on. and they were left out. >> i think in fairness to greifeld it would be a question of priorities in his view. probably you have a relatively small team, the job has got to be to ensure that financially nobody gets hurt rather than appearing on cable television i think is the point he's trying to make. >> no question. i absolutely agree with that. i'm not saying that. i'm saying if you're sitting in the middle of the country you have no idea what's locked up and why. the press is the only conduit of information to you. i would say that we had an issue with facebook. we had an issue with the flash crash. we had an issue yesterday with what occurred on the nasdaq, technological issue. what i have an issue with is how it's communiqued to the public and how mom and pop in middle america are actually going to get informed on that and they should be informed because they're the
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)